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 The Third Stage of Inquiry (after reading is ccompleted)

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Kelley
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PostSubject: The Third Stage of Inquiry (after reading is ccompleted)   Mon Jan 15, 2007 11:53 pm

Do you sympathize with the characters? Which ones, and why?

Does the writer's technique give you a clue as to her "argument"- her take on the human condition?

Is the novel self-reflective?

Did the writer's times affect him?

Is there an arguement in this book? Do you agree?
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Minimoosey

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PostSubject: Re: The Third Stage of Inquiry (after reading is ccompleted)   Fri Jan 19, 2007 7:48 am

Sympathy with character - I do not symphathize with the character. I do understand that people have to follow their inner self. In Gulliver's case, he is seeking adventure. He doesn't however accept his society before he leaves and during the entire book is seeking a better life. He's not happy with his family. He is financially sound to leave his family well provided for. I guess I symphathize a little, for the situations he gets in while looking for that "adventure," but what he does with each situation, he sets himjself up with more heartache.

Self-reflective - I think it could be, I am aware that this was written hundreds of years ago and some things change, but this look on society never changes. We, as a human race, are always looking for a Utopia never to find it unless we have peace of mind. Gulliver never gets there.

The writer's times does affect him. England being of worldly power could make the writer think that this is the best of the best or the most advanced around. If this were the case, this would be pretty sad with all the violence and crime that is displayed. Things haven't changed through time.

Argument in this book - Yes there is an argument in this book. Gullliver is trying to understand these cultures and societies and he can't even understand or accept his own. He therefore, cannot find peace.
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PostSubject: The Third Level of Inquiry: Rhetoric-Stage Reading   Fri Jan 19, 2007 11:00 pm

Do you sympathize with the characters? Which ones, and why?
I think that it is difficult not to sympathize with all of the cultures and characters. Especially as we see the contrasts between each civilization. When we realize that regardless of the 'race' each socitey is trying to reach the same goals of providing for themselves and thier kind. As with the cultures of modern times, each group feels that 'their way' of approaching this goal is the right way. Each group has a certain sense of pride and worth assigned to themselves, and it is hard for them to see other or better ways from a different culture. I have to sympathize when I realize that we are all in the same situation.

Does the writer's technique give you a clue as to her "argument"- her take on the human condition?
I think that it is easy to interpret Swifts take on the human condition several different ways based on the way he presents Gulliver on the islands. Sometimes we hear the flaws in the way that England and humanity works, but then other times we see that the flaws are what makes it a unique and valuable society. Gulliver often remains true to his country, and shows a sense of pride. I think that Swift illustrates that it is important to be proud of the culture you are from, but aware of both the good and bad characteristics that culture has.

Did the writer's times affect him?
I think that the writer's times did affect his writing. Many of the references are made of current events and stifes of England. I think that by looking at these issues in depth and in a different light, Swift himself can have a better understanding of the times he lives in, as can the reader.

Is there an arguement in this book? Do you agree?
There are several arguments in this book, but the most poignant being that though complex and flawed, humanity is defined by the characteristics of emotions, successess, failures, passion, and desire. These are characteristics that the Houyhnhmns don't have. Though their society is peaceful and efficient it lacks in the variety that humanity survives on.
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PostSubject: Re: The Third Stage of Inquiry (after reading is ccompleted)   Sat Jan 20, 2007 1:27 pm

I think you are right, accepting your own culture is a difficult thing to do. We all have inner turmoil with the good and bad of our cultures and societies. This book does represent the sadness of free-thinking and greed.
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