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Kelley
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PostSubject: Unrelated to the Chapters   Mon Feb 05, 2007 10:34 pm

This forum is for discussion unrelated to the chapters.
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Kelley
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PostSubject: SparkNotes   Thu Aug 30, 2007 1:03 am

A note from SparkNotes:

The Stranger is often referred to as an “existential” novel, but this description is not necessarily accurate. The term “existentialism” is a broad and far-reaching classification that means many different things to many different people, and is often misapplied or overapplied. As it is most commonly used, existentialism refers to the idea that there is no “higher” meaning to the universe or to man’s existence, and no rational order to the events of the world. According to this common definition of existentialism, human life is not invested with a redemptive or affirming purpose—there is nothing beyond man’s physical existence.
Some ideas in The Stranger clearly resemble this working definition of existentialism, but the broader philosophy of existentialism includes aspects far beyond this definition that are not present in The Stranger. Moreover, Camus himself rejected the application of the “existential” label to The Stranger. Hence, this SparkNote approaches The Stranger from the philosophical perspective of the absurd. “The absurd” is a term Camus himself coined, and a philosophy that he himself developed. Reading The Stranger with Camus’s philosophy of the absurd in mind sheds a good deal of light on the text.
Although Camus’s philosophical ideas resonate strongly within the text, it is important to keep in mind that The Stranger is a novel, not a philosophical essay. When reading the novel, character development, plot, and prose style demand just as much attention as the specifics of the absurd. This SparkNote only discusses the absurd when such discussion provides insight on the text. Otherwise, the focus of this SparkNote remains on the text itself, as with any great work of literature.
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Karen

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PostSubject: Re: Unrelated to the Chapters   Thu Aug 30, 2007 5:21 pm

I read this too, but stil have trouble getting around the term 'absurd'. It means rediculous to me. The story seemed to be aabout a man who was conciencless but not in a bad way necessarily. he lived the moment he was in and did not put a lot of feelig or recognize the feelings of others in events that were in the past. He simply put his mother in the home because he could not take care of her. Not to be mean nor did he think she suffered, or if she did she got over it, and that was as it should be in his mind.
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